No need to spend more than $2 billion promoting STEM subjects

Unfortunately Labor’s promise to write-off the HELP debt of 100,000 science, technology, engineering and maths graduates suggests that they have learned little from their previous mistakes in this area. Following a 2007 election promise, to boost science and maths they cut student contributions and introduced a HECS-HELP benefit, under which around $1,700 a year of HELP debt is written off if graduates work in specified occupations related to their degree.

The cut in student contributions was strongly promoted, and there has been on-going advocacy for STEM disciplines from the Chief Scientist, Professor Ian Chubb. There has been a big increase in science demand and domestic undergraduate enrolments – up 35 per cent between 2008 and 2013, or more than 21,000 full-time equivalent places. By far the largest increase has been in the biological sciences, which made up nearly 40 per cent of the total. Engineering, which did not have a cut in student contributions, increased by 32 per cent over the same period, with more than 8,000 additional full-time equivalent places. Science demand kept growing in 2013 and 2014, despite student contributions being put back up again.

As I have long argued, there has never been any evidence that we need a significant boost in bachelor-level science graduates. The latest employment data confirms that the surge of completions in science is only leading to serious un- and under-employment among science graduates, who have been hit especially hard in the general graduate employment downturn. So it is hard to argue that there is any general problem to solve in the first place.

sci take 3

Possibly there are still some niche employment issues in say secondary maths and science teachers – although they have fallen off the skills shortage list. But a promise to write off a few tens of thousands of dollars in student debt is unlikely to change how many people see a teaching career. Even for financially motivated students, the cost of university is not high relative to career earnings for full-time professionals. Perhaps the main thing that will drive graduates to teaching is that they may have few other options, thanks to the over-supply of graduates.

Course and career choices are primarily about interests and aptitudes, with long-term earnings a factor. These can be influenced – people have multiple interests and are not necessarily aware of all the suitable course and career opportunities. But this influence can be achieved without writing off more than $2 billion in student debt (we get similar numbers to the government). A few million dollars in marketing expenditure would probably have the same effect, if this was a desirable outcome – which it is not. Labor’s latest policy is, unfortunately, only likely to to encourage people to make choices that put them at high employment risk.

  1. Spot on Andrew – boosting graduates with an adequate understanding of science and maths is desirable (perhaps less desirable than boosting those with an awareness of classical liberalism) but this does not mean we should further pump prime graduates with science qualifications who are demonstrably struggling to find ways of applying their specific skills in the labour market

  2. I would never advise anyone to do an ICT degree anymore. Over half of ICT graduates cannot get work in their field ( Source AWPA 2013 report) mainly because the job market is flooded with foreign workers.

  3. Andrew’s comments are spot on – there is no evidence of a shortage of science and engineering graduates. If there was – there would be a spike in salaries (which since the mining boom winding down is definitely not evident). However – and this is a vital point (I believe) – there needs to be a stronger STEM component built into all disciplines ranging from business to art to medicine. And this is lacking in the current education of our students. Technology touches everyone’s lives today.

Leave a Comment